Bill Sugg Valley County Health Systems

Four Common Organizational Structures Explained by William T. Sugg

William T. Sugg

Healthcare executive, William T. Sugg, uses his experience to break down the inner workings of a hospital.

Running a large-scale hospital requires a strategic plan and flawless execution, because people’s lives are on the line, after all. High quality services must be offered around the clock, meaning a large team of staff must be functioning precisely. Organizations must create and implement an organizational structure, which is a system that explains how projects and activities are directed and run.

A hospital management structure should include specific details about rules, positions, and responsibilities as well as a plan for how information moves between people. There are many different types of organizational structures that can be used in a hospital setting, or even a combination of more than one.

With more than 25 years of business experience, William T. Sugg, founder of a 501c (3) Healthcare Foundation and a Corporate University, explains four commonly used organizational structures.

Divisional

A divisional organizational structure is very commonly found in hospitals and healthcare organizations. With this system, team members are grouped together based on their specializations in effort to achieve a high level of efficiency. For example, based on experience and expertise, doctors and nurses are divided into different areas in the hospital like pediatrics, surgery, radiology, etc.

Flat

Commonly seen in younger companies, a flat organizational structure better represents a liberal management system where each team member is their own boss. William T. Sugg describes the characteristics of a flat organizational structure to include more open communication policies and shared work spaces.

Functional

A functional organizational system is regularly seen in small and medium sized organizations and promotes quick decision making. Employees are grouped together based on the tasks they perform within the organization. For example, the finance department might include an accountant, auditor, chief financial officer, a financial analyst, etc. This helps people working closely towards a common goal have better communication and teamwork. William T. Sugg describes a con to the functional organizational structure as a lack of communication between different departments within the organization as a whole. It can lead to groups having a narrow focus on their tasks instead of seeing the company vision or big picture.

Matrix

A matrix organizational system combines components of the functional and divisional systems. First, people are grouped into functional departments, and are then separated even more into divisional projects. This system allows employees to have a lot of freedom, and also a lot of responsibility. It promotes innovation and creativity, and is one of the most popular systems used today. This is the most complex system, and William T. Sugg knows it requires strategic planning and excellent execution.

About William T. Sugg

Throughout his management career, William T. Sugg, also known as Bill, has worked through almost every major crisis possible in a hospital setting, including deadly tornadoes, floods, fires, scandals and rebuilding the 17th most beautiful hospital in the United States. He is a politically astute healthcare executive with more than 25 years of experience. His leadership style is approachable, transparent, and people centered. William T. Sugg believes in a strong teamwork culture that promotes respect, trust, commitment, and dedication to goals and values.

Corporate Universities are Changing Business, Explained by William T. Sugg

William T. Sugg of Valley County Health Systems promotes internal education programs, which are beneficial for both the organization and its employees.

Corporate universities first appeared in the mid-20th century as a response to rapidly changing business environments. Although many new employees receive a college education or formal training, it’s often times not enough preparation for a role in a high-level corporation. As the need for specialization and product development grows, so does the need for a new approach to corporate education.

With more than 25 years of business experience, William T. Sugg, founder of a 501c (3) Healthcare Foundation and a Corporate University, explains why internal education is key to a healthy, successful company.

Value to the Organization

An internal corporate university has curriculum that pertains to the organization specifically. Investing in employees has been shown to drive performance and results, as each person is fully equipped for the job at hand. William T. Sugg of Valley County Health Systems suggests that corporate universities also aid in the hiring process by opening the door to candidates who have the right attitude and energy, but perhaps not the experience that would normally be required. Reinforcing a positive and consistent work culture across all departments in the organization is a huge advantage to corporations.

Impact on Employees

A corporate university encourages individual growth, where employees can develop skills relevant to their career goals. William T. Sugg of Valley County Health Systems has seen how open discussion fosters development and innovation, and allows employees to connect with peers. When the program is complete, employees are more prepared and more confident at work. Corporate universities also create an increase in employee retention rate, as team members have more opportunities to grow within their roles and at the company.

Strategic Planning and Education

New research suggests that corporate universities can play a huge role in planning for the future. William T. Sugg of Valley County h=Health Systems explains that it’s a great opportunity to discuss the overall vision for a company, and set multi-year goals for teams. It can help employees understand how their projects tie together and make a difference in the organization. Presenting critical information in a condensed and easy to understand format saves time, and puts everyone on the same page with a shared vision.

About William T. Sugg

Throughout his management career, William T. Sugg of Valley County Health Systems, also known as Bill, has worked through almost every major crisis possible in a hospital setting, including deadly tornadoes, floods, fires, scandals and rebuilding the 17th most beautiful hospital in the United States. He is a politically astute healthcare executive with more than 25 years of experience. His leadership style is approachable, transparent, and people centered. William T. Sugg believes in a strong teamwork culture that promotes respect, trust, commitment, and dedication to goals and values.